Fall 2019

Fall 2019 Courses

CCN      ClassSecUnitsInstructorDaysFromToRoom Building
24.  Berkeley Freshman Seminars. (1)   Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar per week. Prerequisites: Priority given to freshmen. The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Enrollment limited to 15 freshmen.Staff

32585  EDUC 24 001 1 Switkes, E. Tu 3:00 PM 5:00 PM    768 Evans
130.  Knowing and Learning in Mathematics and Science. (3)  Three hours of lecture and one hour of fieldwork per week. Prerequisites: Any of UGIS 81A, UGIS 81B or UGIS 82. This course offers a sequence of collaborative problem-solving and reflection activities through which students will be able to appreciate and develop a coherent, effective approach to the teaching and learning of any mathematical or scientific conceptual domain. Issues of cognition, culture, and pedagogy will emerge from participants' struggles to explain their own reasoning. In-class problem solving experiences will provide grist for reflection. Students do course projects in local classrooms. (F, SP) Abrahamson

28980  EDUC 130 001 3 Brodsky Chase, K. W 5:00 PM 8:00 PM    20 Wheeler
29038  EDUC 130 101 Brodsky Chase, K. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
131AC.  Classroom Interactions in Science and Mathematics: A focus on Equity and Urban Schools. (3)   Three hours of seminar per week.This course continues the process of preparing students to teach science and mathematics in secondary schools by providing opportunities to evaluate challenges they face in instructional settings. We will explore frameworks for thinking about equity issues in the classroom and beyond school settings, learn strategies for teaching students of diverse backgrounds, and consider how classroom interactions enable students to develop a deep understanding of the subject matter. This course satisfies the American cultures requirement. (F,SP) Poon

28981  EDUC 131AC 001 3 Golub, D. Tu 5:00 PM 8:00 PM    108 Wheeler
140AC.  The Art of Making Meaning. (4)   Three hours of lecture, one hour of discussion and two hours of fieldwork per week for Fall/Spring. Six hour of lecture, two hours of discussion and seven hours of fieldwork per week for Summer. Drawing from both hostorical and contemporary sociocultural theories on literacy and language as well as recent research from education and ew media scholars, we will explore an array of digital and non-digital forms of meaning-making and symbolic creativity, such as meme-generating, video making, micro-blogging, multi-player gaming, and app designing, as well as more traditional and non-digital or pre-digital forms of cultural participation and civic engagement. This course satisfies the American cultures requirement.Hull

29056  EDUC 140AC 001 4 Hull, G. TuTh 9:30 AM 11:00 AM    166 Barrows
29061  EDUC 140AC 101 Hull, G. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Discussion
29062  EDUC 140AC 102 Hull, G. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
W140A.  The Art of Making Meaning. (4)   Three hours of lecture+ one hr fieldwork per week. This course combines theory and practice in the study of literacy and development. It will introduce sociocultural educational theory and research focused especially on literacy teaching and learning, and this literature will be examined in practice through participation in after-school programs. In addition, the course will contribute to an understanding of how literacy is reflected in race, culture, and ethnicity im the United States and how these symbolic systems shift in a digital world.(F, SP, SU) Hull

29057  EDUC W140A 001 4 Hull, G. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Web-Based Lec
29058  EDUC W140A 101 Hull, G. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
W142.  Education in a Global World. (3)  Three hours of lecture per week. Eight hours of lecture per week for 8 weeks. What is globalization? What are the implications of living in a "global world" fo education? How can education be used as a tool to promote global social justice and prosperity? In Education in a Global World we will address these and other related questions through collective reading assigments, discussions, and online collaboration througth our learning platform (Canvas).(F, SP,SU) Murphy-Graham

29063  EDUC W142 001 3 Murphy-Graham, E. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Web-Based Lec
W144.  Practicum in Education. (1-3)  Thirty minutes of video lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Research Practicum in Education is designed to provide an opportunity for undergraduates to gain knowledge of qualitative research methods through critically reflecting on practicum work conducted in an educational setting. Students have the option of conducting practicum work in one of four course strands: (1) working with K-12 youth or peers; (2) conducting guided research; (3) working in an education-providing institution; and (4) course assistance in a university class. (Su) Hull, Underwood

29097  EDUC W144 001 1-3 Murphy-Graham, E. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Web-Based Lec
29110  EDUC W144 002 1-3 Murphy-Graham, E. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Web-Based Lec
29098  EDUC W144 101 Murphy-Graham, E. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Web-Based Dis
29099  EDUC W144 102 Murphy-Graham, E. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
29111  EDUC W144 201 1-3 Murphy-Graham, E. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Web-Based Dis
29112  EDUC W144 202 1-3 Murphy-Graham, E. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
C148.  Education and INternational Development. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. This course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of international development education. Through the use of lectures, discussions, and multimedia presentations, students will examine three core themes: 1) the purpose of education; 2) how contemporary development policy conceptualizes education; 3) education as a tool for social transformation. To the extent possible, the course draws connections between theory and practical case studies of international education programs, policy statements, and initiatives. Also listed as IAS C148. (F) Murphy-Graham

31310  EDUC C148 001 4 Murphy-Graham, E. CANC 9:30 AM 11:00 AM     BWW
150.  Advanced Studies in Education. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week.This course is an advanced undergraduate seminar in current issues and topics in education. Course will focus on specific issues or research methods in the multidisciplinary field of education. A major research project is required as well as class presentations. Topics change each semester.(F,SP) Staff

33420  EDUC 150 001 3 Sengupta-Irving, T. TuTh 12:30 PM 2:00 PM    3113 Etcheverry
W161.  Digital Learning Environment. (3)  Three hours of lecture per week. Digital learning environment are taking residence in the educational experience of many, from replacing components of traditional classroom instruction to providing open platforms for lifelong learning. In this class we will study the various forms and functions of a sampling of digital learning environments ranging from subject specific Intelligent Tutoring Systems in K-12 to domain neutral systems for post-secondary online learning.(F, Su) Pardos

32756  EDUC W161 001 3 Pardos, Z. CANC 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
C181.  Race, Identity, and Culture in Urban Schools. (3)   Three hours of seminar/discussion per week. This course will focus on understanding urban schools as a part of a broader system of social stratification and the process by which students in urban schools come to a sense of themselves as students, as members of cultural and racial groups, and as young people in America. Topics include racial identity; race/ethnicity in schools; urban neighborhood congtexts; and schooling in the juvenile justice system. Students will also integrate course readings with their own first-hand experience working in one of several off-campus sites. This course has a mandatory community engagement component for which students will earn 1 unit of field study (197) credit. Also listed as African American Studies C133A. (SP) Suad-Bakari

31311  EDUC C181 001 3 Bristol, T. M 2:00 PM 5:00 PM    101 Moffitt
186AC.  The Southern Border. (4)   Four hours of lecture/discussion per week. The southern border--from California to Florida--is the longest physical divide between the First and Third Worlds. This course will examine the border as a distinct landscape where North-South relations take on a specific spatial and cultural dimension, and as a region which has been the testing ground for such issues as free trade, immigration, and ethnic politics. Also listed as Ethnic Studies 159AC and Geography 159AC. This course satisfies the American cultures requirement.Manz, Shaiken

28943  EDUC 186AC 001 4 Shaiken, H. TuTh 3:30 PM 5:00 PM    2050 VLSB
28944  EDUC 186AC 101 Shaiken, H. Tu 2:00 PM 3:00 PM    250 Dwinelle
28945  EDUC 186AC 102 Shaiken, H. F 12:00 PM 1:00 PM    175 Barrows
28946  EDUC 186AC 103 Shaiken, H. M 9:00 AM 10:00 AM    70 Evans
28947  EDUC 186AC 104 Shaiken, H. F 1:00 PM 2:00 PM    B51 Hildebrand
28948  EDUC 186AC 105 Shaiken, H. W 4:00 PM 5:00 PM    185 Barrows
28949  EDUC 186AC 106 Shaiken, H. Tu 11:00 AM 12:00 PM    2066 VLSB
28950  EDUC 186AC 107 Shaiken, H. Th 8:00 AM 9:00 AM    122 Barrows
28951  EDUC 186AC 108 Shaiken, H. Th 11:00 AM 12:00 PM    151 Barrows
28952  EDUC 186AC 109 Shaiken, H. M 4:00 PM 5:00 PM    155 Barrows
28953  EDUC 186AC 110 Shaiken, H. W 5:00 PM 6:00 PM    70 Evans
190AC.  Critical Studies in Education. (4)   Four hours of lecture and discussion per week. This course examines how learning environments can empower and disempower individuals and explores the role of education in the social construction of hierarchy, inequality, difference, identity, and power. It embodies a democratic philosophy and practice, creating a learning community that encourages students to take responsibility for their own education and learn through theory, experience, and dialogue. All students must engage in a community project. Course satisfies the American Cultures Requirement.(F,SP) Hull

15096  EDUC 190AC 001 4 Hull, G. MW 10:00 AM 12:00 PM    289 Cory
15097  EDUC 190AC 002 4 Hull, G. CANC 12:00 PM 2:00 PM    241 Cory
15098  EDUC 190AC 003 4 Hull, G. CANC 11:00 AM 1:00 PM    107 GPB
W190A.  Critical Studies in Education. (3)   Six hours of lecture per week. This course examines how learning environments can empower and disempower individuals and explores the role of education in the social construction of hierarchy, inequality, difference, identity, and power. It embodies a democratic philosophy and practice, creating a learning community that encourages students to take responsibility for their own education and learn through theory, experience, and dialogue. (F,SP) Serrano>

33430  EDUC W190A 001 3 Serrano, C. M 6:00 PM 8:00 PM     Online
33869  EDUC W190A 002 3 Serrano, C. Tu 6:00 PM 8:00 PM     Online
197.  Field Studies. (1-4)   Course may be repeated for credit. One to four hours of fieldwork per week. Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. University organized and supervised field programs involving experiences in schools and school-related activities. (F,SP) Staff

E1135  EDUC 197 003 1-4 TBA 12:00 AM 12:00 AM    TBA BWW
E1136  EDUC 197 004 1-4 TBA 12:00 AM 12:00 AM    TBA BWW
E1137  EDUC 197 005 1-4 TBA 12:00 AM 12:00 AM    TBA BWW
E1138  EDUC 197 006 1-4 TBA 12:00 AM 12:00 AM    TBA BWW
E1139  EDUC 197 007 1-4 TBA 12:00 AM 12:00 AM    TBA BWW
E1140  EDUC 197 008 1-4 TBA 12:00 AM 12:00 AM    TBA BWW
E1141  EDUC 197 009 1-4 TBA 12:00 AM 12:00 AM    TBA BWW
200D.  Psychosocial Development: Identity, Culture, and Education. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: One course in statistics. This course is a doctoral seminar in developmental psychology, with a broad focus on psychosocial development and its impact on children in educational contexts. The course begins with a discussion of Erikson's psychosocial theory and the sociocultural perspectives of Vygotsky and other theorists. We then review some of the major psychosocial variables related to educational achievement, including competence, motivation, self-concept, self-efficacy, self-regulation, and volition. We touch briefly on moral development and values as psychosocial factors affecting correlates. We examine (a) how social and personal identity factors are used to explain underachievement (e.g., cultural ecological theory and stereotype threat), (b) the role of identity in different cultural groups, (c) the impact of these factors on teacher and student behavior, and (d) the role that identity plays in helping students develop a sense of future. (F) Worrell

31317  EDUC 200D 001 3 Worrell, F. M 9:00 AM 12:00 PM    4101 BWW
204C.  Research Seminars: Inquiry in Educational Psychology. (3)   Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of seminar per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. The doctoral program in Educational Psychology requires that students complete extensive projects of documentary and empirical research. As they engage in these projects, students will enroll (ordinarily during alternate years) in appropriate sections of this seminar. At each meeting, participants will present their own projects, and analyze those presented by others. Worrell

31318  EDUC 204C 001 3 Worrell, F. M 5:30 PM 7:30 PM    1207 BWW
33875  EDUC 204C 002 3 Yang, C. Th 1:00 PM 3:00 PM    4244 BWW
207B.  IAssessment of Cognitive Functioning. (4)   Three hours of lecture and six hours of fieldwork per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Theories of intelligence as applied to the assessment of intelligence, measurement concepts applied to intelligence tests, development, administration and interpretation of the WISC-R, Stanford-Binet, and other issues pertaining to intelligence testing. Current controversial issues in testing, including issues pertaining to test bias and legal aspects of testing.Staff

29025  EDUC 207B 001 4 Ojeda-Beck, A. Tu 9:00 AM 12:00 PM    4424 BWW
29039  EDUC 207B 101 Ojeda-Beck, A. Tu 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
207D.  Assessment and Education of Exceptional Pupils in Regular Classes. (2)   One hour of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Methods for assessment of handicapped children and implication for their education in regular classes. Such topics as nondiscriminating testing, least restrictive environments, alternative programs, parent communication, interpersonal relationships, characteristics, behavior of exceptional pupils are covered in studies of individual exceptional children in regular classes.Staff

28976  EDUC 207D 001 2 Futterman, D. Tu 5:00 PM 7:00 PM    1203 BWW
210.  Practicum in Science and Math Education Research and Development. (1-4)   Course may be repeated for credit. One unit of credit for each four hours of student effort per week. Two hours of meeting per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Practical experience on an educational research or development project on campus or elsewhere for 8-12 hours per week. Class meetings augment research experience with discussions of readings and interaction with guest speakers.(F,SP)

29032  SESAME 210 001 1-4 Goldwasser, L. TuTh 11:00 AM 1:00 PM    1204 BWW
211A.  Development, Learning and Instruction in Cultural Contexts. (3:3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Admission to Developmental Teacher Education Program or consent of instructor. Introduction to theories of human development and their application to elementary and preschool education. Topics include cognitive development, moral and social development, language acquisition, psycho-social perspectives on social-emotional development and a developmental analysis of classroom organization. Also supervised child study, individual and small group tutoring, and field experiences. Staff

33518  EDUC 211A 001 3 Philip, T. M 2:00 PM 5:00 PM    1203 BWW
213A.  Theoretical and Scientific Bases for School Psychology, Part I: Childhood. (3)   Two hours of lecture and three hours of fieldwork per week. Historical and contemporary overview of the professional specialty of school psychology. Examines the empirical evidence for developmental and learning models in relation to the school curriculum and school organization for birth through pre-adolescence. Staff

28969  EDUC 213A 001 3 Ojeda-Beck, A. Tu 1:00 PM 4:00 PM    4401 BWW
29043  EDUC 213A 101 Ojeda-Beck, A. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
213C.  School-Based Consultation. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Theories of consultation, consultation methods, and research on consultation applicable to primary and secondary prevention of school failure and school psychology practice.Lambert

28971  EDUC 213C 001 3 Worrell, F. Tu 2:00 PM 5:00 PM    1208 BWW
213L.  Laboratory for School Psychology. (1)   Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Laboratory section to evaluate field work records and for supervision of school assignment. Must be taken concurrently with 213A-213B-213C-213D.Staff

28973  EDUC 213L 001 1 Payson-Hays, S. Tu 2:00 PM 3:00 PM    1207 BWW
29044  EDUC 213L 101 Payson-Hays, S. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
28974  EDUC 213L 002 1 Payson-Hays, S. Tu 1:00 PM 2:00 PM    1207 BWW
29089  EDUC 213L 201 1 Payson-Hays, S. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
29117  EDUC 213L 003 1 Ojeda-Beck, A. Tu 4:00 PM 5:00 PM    1207 BWW
29118  EDUC 213L 301 1 Ojeda-Beck, A. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
33567  EDUC 213L 004 1 Perry, K. Tu 9:00 AM 10:00 AM    1207 BWW
33568  EDUC 213L 401 1 Perry, K. TBA 12:00 AM 12:00 AM    TBA Field Work
215.  Socialization Processes Within the Family. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. This course provides an overview of theoretical perspectives on family socialization. We review the literature on parental beliefs and child-rearing practices and study how families affect children's social development. We also examine familes in the context of culture and social class. The course concludes by focusing on the relationship between families and schools. Course requirements: class participation, three short papers, reaction notebook. Holloway

33516  EDUC 215 001 3 Yang, C. W 1:00 PM 4:00 PM    4215 BWW
222C.  Design-Based Research Forum. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. A design-build-implement-analyze-theorize-publicize practicum forum for participants to first learn about design-based educational research work receive supportin their original and on-going projects. Following several orientation weeks, in which we discuss fundamental resources and participate in hands-on activities, subsequent readings are customized to individual students. The course culminates with presentations, and students submit an empirical research paper.(S,F) Abrahamson

29035  EDUC 222C 001 3 Abrahamson, D. M 1:00 PM 4:00 PM    4401 BWW
223B.  Special Problems in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education. (2-6)   Course may be repeated for credit. Consent of instructor required. Two to six hours of lecture/discussion per week. Study of special problems and issues in education related to mathematics, science and technology. Sections may vary from semester to semester.Staff

18561  EDUC 223B 002 2-6 Linn, M. Tu 3:00 PM 5:00 PM    1203 BWW
33286  EDUC 223B 003 2-6 Wilkerson, M. F 11:00 AM 1:00 PM    1204 BWW
18562  EDUC 223B 004 2-6 Schoenfeld, A. Tu 1:00 PM 3:00 PM    1204 BWW
18563  EDUC 223B 005 2-6 Schoenfeld, A. Tu 3:00 PM 5:00 PM    1204 BWW
18564  EDUC 223B 006 2-6 Ranney, M. F 12:00 PM 4:00 PM    4101 BWW
18565  EDUC 223B 011 2-6 Abrahamson, D. Tu 12:00 PM 2:00 PM    1216 BWW
18566  EDUC 223B 012 2-6 Abrahamson, D. Tu 3:00 PM 5:00 PM    1216 BWW
224A.  Mathematical Thinking and Problem Solving. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. This course explores contemporary research on mathematical cognition, with a particular emphasis on "higher order thinking skills" and mathematical problem solving. We discuss various frameworks for characterizing mathematical behavior and various methodologies for examining it. As an "action oriented" course in the EMST curricular sequence, this course includes a major course project. In their project, students engage in research incorporating the main ideas studied in the course.Schoenfeld

31351  EDUC 224A 001 3 Schoenfeld, A. W 2:00 PM 5:00 PM    1215 BWW
231.  MACSME Methods in Curriculum and Instruction. (4)   Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture per week plus three full day workshops. Prerequisites: Admission to a credential program. MACSME Methods in Curriculum and Instruction is a core course in the two-year MACSME program. MACSME students take the class in both their first and second years, creating opportunities to consider issues related to curriculum and instruction that are central to the development their own teaching practice in a structured and supported environment over time. The teaching methods course will use the Teaching for Robust Understanding framework (TRU) to explore issues of teaching and learning through five dimensions: core math and science content; cognitive demand; access and equity; student identity and agency; and formative assessment. We will focus on a set of core teaching practices that accomplished STEM teachers regularly implement, which can be broken down into “decompositions of core practices” for pre-service teachers to examine, rehearse, and practice through “approximations of practice” in authentic, but low-stakes settings. Our goal is to directly connect our work in the MACSME methods class with actual teaching and learning in K-12 classrooms - MACSME students will have regular opportunities to engage with classroom teachers and students at school sites, with both observational and teaching responsibilities, with the support of MACSME teacher educators.Disston

28972  EDUC 231 001 4 Boda, P. Th 4:00 PM 7:00 PM    1215 BWW
29059  EDUC 231 101 Boda, P. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
231B.  Teaching, Learning, and Equity II. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. This course promotes understanding of equitable approaches to teaching and learning in the context of public education in California as well as our nation. It focuses on conceptual frameworks and pedagogical/curricular strategies that enable students' social-emotional and moral growth as well as positive identity development. We also explore how historical, structural, cultural, economic, and political considerations facilitate or create challenges to students' productive growth and development.Mahiri, Nucci

31352  EDUC 231B 001 3 Mozenter, S. Tu 1:00 PM 4:00 PM    4101 BWW
34015  EDUC 231B 002 3 Baquedano-Lopez, P. Tu 1:00 PM 4:00 PM    4500 BWW
232A.  Critical Studied in K-12 STEM. (3)   Three hours of seminar per week. The course examines how ideologies of race, smartness, and gender frame policy and practice in STEM education, and with what impact on minoritized students. The course then presents case studies of STEM curricula and programs designed to disrupt normative frameworks rationalizing STEM for minoritized youth that imagien different social and political imperatives for STEM learning. The course concludes by identifying enduring tensions and new possibilities for STEM education in (and out) schools.Sengupta-Irving

33421  EDUC 232A 001 3 Sengupta-Irving, T. W 2:00 PM 5:00 PM    1203 BWW
234.  Reading and Writing at the Secondary Level. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. In keeping with the BE3 program’s mission of equity and excellence, this course will use a critical literacy framework to evaluate reading and writing instructional approaches in math, science, and English language arts. Course discussions and assignments will be centered in Janks’ (2010) book Literacy and Power. Students will also read, discuss, and produce discipline-specific texts related to each dimension of Janks’ framework: domination, diversity, access, and design.Catterson

31353  EDUC 234 001 3 Staff CANC 2:00 PM 4:00 PM    1217 BWW
235A.  Scientific Thinking and Learning (3)   Three hours of seminar per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Introduction to contemporary research, pedagogy, and policy in science education. Reviews contemporary empirical research standards and reform documents, and curricular materials. Students conduct interviews with young learners and engage in their own analyses of classroom video and written work to learn to notice and respond to student thinking. Strategies for equitable instruction, including addressing the needs of dual language learners and minoritized populations, are explored.Saxe

33426  EDUC 235A 001 3 Wilkerson, M. CANC 2:00 PM 5:00 PM    1216 BWW
236B.  Elementary Teaching in Mathematics. (3)   One hour of lecture and two hrs of discussion per week. This course is designed to strengthen methods for students' mathematical development. Students will gain facility with methods that support the learning of children with diverse instructional needs. The course emphasizes an inquiry-based approach that includes the use of rich problems, appropriate tools and representations, various discourse formats, and ongoing assessment.Gearhart

29084  EDUC 236B 001 3 Soni, S. Tu 9:00 AM 12:00 PM    4101 BWW
29085  EDUC 236B 101 Soni, S. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Discussion
238.  Foundations for Teaching Reading in Grades K-8. (2-3)   Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Admission to a teaching credential program (summer session excluded).Formerly 258A-258B. Introduction to reading and writing instruction in elementary school settings, basic literacy skills, instructional methods and approaches, assessment procedures, and reading and writing theories. Formerly known as EDUC 158. Cunningham

32500  EDUC 238 001 2-3 Cunningham, A. M 5:00 PM 7:00 PM    1215 BWW
& Firestone, A.
32501  EDUC 238 101 Cunningham, A. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
& Firestone, A.
240A.  Language Study for Educators. (3)   Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. This course will introduce students to the broad areas of language study and explore the implications of such study for teaching and learning. Among course topics are: the nature of language, the meanings of "grammar," the varieties of English, the development of language in the preschool and school years. This course will be required for all Ed.D. students and recommended as an introductory course to all students who have had no formal coursework in linguistics.Fillmore, Baquedano-Lopez

29109  EDUC 240A 001 3 Gutierrez, K. W 2:00 PM 5:00 PM    4500 BWW
243.  Advanced QUalitative Methods. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week.The goal of this class is to provide students with ongoing opportunities to expend their qualitative methodological toolkit, with particular emphasis on the following topics: developing a conceptual framework, study design, data collection, data analysis and representation, and writing social sciences research. These topics will be examined in the context of the design, development, and write-up of students' own research. (SP) Gutierrez

29054  EDUC 243 001 3 Gutierrez, K. M 1:00 PM 4:00 PM    4500 BWW
244B.  Methods for Teaching English in the Secondary Schools. (4)   Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Enrollment in CLAD/Secondary Schools credential program. This methods course introduces the teaching of secondary English. It focuses on theories for grounding classroom decisions and connects theory and practice. The course models effective approaches to teaching English and introduces issues in constructing a secondary English curriculum. Students gain a foundation for developing plans for lessons and units of instruction as well as a sense of how to build academic communities of diverse learners, including non-native speakers of English. (F) Freedman, Cziko

28970  EDUC 244B 001 4 Lai, P. Th 4:00 PM 7:00 PM    1212 BWW
252B.  The Ethnography of Literacy. (3)   Three hours of seminar per week. This course approaches reading as a socio-cultural activity and considers recent ethnographic work on reading practices in different educational settings, communities, and historical epochs. By considering how reading is differently conceived and realized in a wide range of contexts, this course will shed light on reading as a historically contingent, ideologically shaped, and socio-culturally organized practice. More specifically, this course has a twofold aim: 1) to introduce students to recent ethnographic research on reading practices; 2) to familiarize them with ethnographic methodology. To this scope, in addition to reading exemplary studies of reading practices, students will also conduct a small-scale ethnographic research project in settings of their choice. (F) Sterponi

33708  EDUC 252B 001 3 Sterponi, L. W 2:00 PM 5:00 PM    1204 BWW
257.  Theoretical Foundations for the Cultural Study of Sport in Education. (3)   Three hours of seminar per week. The cultural study of sport examines the ways in which institutionalized physical activity embodies and reflects social meanings and identities. The social practice of sport provides a space in which dominant discourses of race, gender, and social class are reproduced and resisted. As these physical activities become institutionalized, commercialized, and embedded within educational institutions themselves, individuals must navigate a nuanced and often conflicted terrain in their respective participation and performance. This course, then, examines the role of sport in society broadly and the relationship of sport and education more specifically. The curriculum reviews the writing and research on sport and education from a sociological, psychological, and philosophical perspective, with a particular focus on the constructed divide of mind and body, as manifested in the institutional conflicts between school and sport. Van Rheenen

29027  EDUC 257 001 3 Van Rheenen, D. M 9:30 AM 12:00 PM    4401 BWW
C260F.  Machine Learning in Education. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. This course covers computational approaches to the task of modeling learning and improving outcomes in Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) and Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). We will cover theories and methodologies underpinning current approaches to knowledge discovery and data mining in education and survey the latest developments in the broad field of human learning research. The course is project based; teams will be introduced to online learning platforms and their datasets with the objective of pairing data analysis with theory or implementation. Literature review will add context and grounding to projects.Pardos

33193  EDUC C260F 001 3 Pardos, Z. CANC 12:30 PM 2:00 PM    1215 BWW
261A.  Organization Theory in Education and Other Social Services. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Concepts of power, authority, legitimacy, professions, controls, incentives, etc., as they apply to education or other social services.

31324  EDUC 261A 001 3 Fuller, B. CANC 1:00 PM 4:00 PM    4215 BWW
262B.  School Supervision: Theory and Practice. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Concepts and practices associated with the analysis of teaching and clinical supervision of teachers in urban systems. The role of the urban school leader in supervising teachers.Staff

29017  EDUC 262B 001 3 Guilkey-Amado, J. M 6:00 PM 9:00 PM    1102 BWW
& Sablo-Sutton, S.
262F.  Organizational Policy and Teachers' Work. (3)   Three hours of seminar per week. Students will examine the ways in which state, district, and workplace policy bears upon various aspects of teachers' work. Special emphasis is given to the way in which policy choices--at whatever level--shape the experience of teaching and the organization of schooling. Among the policy areas considered are those governing membership in the teaching occupation, teaching assignments, classroom autonomy regarding curriculum and instruction, performance evaluation, and opportunities for professional development. This course is a requirement for students in educational administration and those students completing the Professional Administration Services Credential. It is open to all other interested students.

29018  EDUC 262F 001 3 Green, T. W 6:00 PM 9:00 PM    1104 BWW
C265C.  Research Advances in Race, Diversity, and Educational Policy. (3)   Three hours of seminar per week. This introductory graduate seminar will engage the research literature on race, diversity, and educational policy to provide a foundation for examining contemporary issues in American public schooling. We will examine research on race, culture, and learning alongside more policy driven research on school structures, governance, finance, politics, and policy. In doing so, we will blend micro level examinations of teaching and learning with macro level considerations of politics and policy. Also listed as African American Studies C265. (Sp)Suad-Bakari, Scott

29065  EDUC C265C 001 3 Scott, J. Tu 12:00 PM 2:00 PM    1102 BWW
269B.  Citizenship, Democracy, and Education Research Group. (3)   Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.Research group for graduate students whose work focuses on the role of schools in impeding or promoting social, economic, cultural, and political democracy. Provides extensive feedback on all phases of research and its application to the democratization of education. Topics range depend on students' interests and range from curriculum and pedagogy to the evolution of social movements for racial justice in education. (F,SP) Perlstein

29005  EDUC 269B 001 3 Perlstein, D. Th 10:00 AM 12:00 PM    1207 BWW
270B.  BEAR Center Seminar. (2,3)   Course may be repeated for credit. Two hours of seminar and one hour of discussion per week. This seminar constitutes one of the ways in which the Berkeley Evaluation and Assessment Research (BEAR) Center fulfills its role of supporting student research. The topic of the seminar will change from semester to semester, following themes chosen by the instructor and the participants. The seminar is an opportunity for students and faculty to present their recent and ongoing work for in-depth review and commentary. In addition, visitors to the campus with expertise relevant to the topic(s) under examination will be invited to present at the seminar and join in the discussion. Students taking this course for two units will make a presentation of a current research interest to the seminar. Students taking this course for three units will also be required to attend a one-hour discussion following each presentation and will write a critique of one other student's presentation.Wilson

29019  EDUC 270B 001 2-3 Wilson, M. Tu 2:00 PM 4:00 PM    1212 BWW
29040  EDUC 270B 101 Wilson, M. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Disc
272B.  School Data Analysis for Principals. (1-2)   Average of five hours of lecture per week for six weeks. The course focuses on preparing future school leaders for leading school improvement by using statistical analysis, understanding the use of formative assessments, evaluating and using educational research particularly related to instructional materials and best practices, creating an effective PowerPoint presentation, and understanding different types of classroom grading and grade reporting practices. Term assessments include keys to quality assessment audit, best practice case study, research-based instructional materials analysis, educational research presentation, grading policy, and several reflection pieces.(F,SP) Cheung

29006  EDUC 272B 001 1-2 Cheung, R. S 9:00 AM 1:00 PM    1102 BWW
& Rosenthal, L.
274A.  Measurement in Education and the Social Sciences I. (4)   Four hours of lecture per week. Formerly Educational Psychology 208A. Students will learn good measurement practice by constructing an instrument and investigating its measurement properties (specifically, validity, and reliability). The act of measuring will be positioned as a link between qualitative observations and quantitative measures, and this will be discussed in a variety of contexts, such as interviewing, standardized testing, and performance assessment. We will discuss both classical and modern testing approaches from conceptual and practical points of view.Wilson

29004  EDUC 274A 001 4 Wilson, M. M 10:00 AM 12:00 PM    1215 BWW
276A.  Introduction to Program Evaluation. (3)   Three hours of lecture per week. Formerly 293C. This course provides an introduction to the field of program evaluation ("programs" might be curriculum innovations, school reorganizations, teacher training reforms, instructional methods innovations, funding programs, or programs in the health or welfare areas). It will give an overview of issues of concern to practicing evaluators, researchers, program managers, and academics interested in field-based research. Those taking the course will be introduced to the history of the field, the basic concepts and intellectual disputes, the major methodological issues, and to some common "models" of how an evaluation ought to be conducted. Based on the understandings of the topics and issues discussed in this course, participants will be asked to conceptualize and design an evaluation in their area of personal and/or professional interests. The purpose of this exercise is for participants to develop skills for framing evaluation questions, designing, and describing an evaluation plan. (F) Newton

29026  EDUC 276A 001 3 Morell, L. W 2:00 PM 5:00 PM    1212 BWW
280A.  Proseminar: Sociocultural Critique of Education. (3;3)   Three hours of seminar per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. These interdisciplinary seminars address a series of questions. In what ways can philosophical, sociological, anthropological, historical, and psychological forms of inquiry be brought together to bear on the analysis of learning, on schooling, and on education more generally? What do we mean by critical and interpretive theories, and what are their relations with social practice? How can education come to constitute itself otherwise than in its current form?Gifford

28979  EDUC 280A 001 3 Leonardo, Z. Tu 1:00 PM 4:00 PM    4244 BWW
283F.  Urban Education. (3)   Three hours of seminar per week. This course will explore the relationship between macroeconomic and political trends and public education in inner city schools. The impact of these larger societal phenomena upon drop-out rates, school climate, teacher morale, and academic achievement will be investigated through a combination of reading and field research in Oakland and Berkeley schools. An examination and evaluation of current proposals for reform of urban schools will also be included. (F,SP) Seyer-Oci, staff

33922  EDUC 283F 001 3 Dumas, M. Tu 4:00 PM 7:00 PM    4310 BWW
290A.  Special Topics Seminars.   Course may be repeated for credit. One hour of seminar per week per unit. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Topics to vary from semester to semester and section to section.

290A.  Policy, Organization, Measurement, and Evaluation. (1-4)  (F,SP) Staff

33304  EDUC 290A 001 1-4 Britton, T. TuTh 10:00 AM 11:30 AM    4244 BWW
15108  EDUC 290A 002 1-4 Wilson, M. Tu 4:00 PM 6:00 PM    1212 BWW
33893  EDUC 290A 003 1-4 Pardos, Z. F 2:00 PM 3:30 PM    4215 BWW
33802  EDUC 290A 005 1-4 Goldwasser, L. M 4:00 PM 5:30 PM    1102 BWW
15106  EDUC 290A 006 1-4 Baquedano-Lopez, P. M 1:00 PM 4:00 PM    4101 BWW
& Fuller, B.
290B.  Special Topics Seminars.   Course may be repeated for credit. One hour of seminar per week per unit. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Topics to vary from semester to semester and section to section.

290B.  Education in Language, Literacy, and Culture. (1-4)   Staff

14908  EDUC 290B 001 1-4 Van Rheenen, D. Tu 1:00 PM 4:00 PM    4422 BWW
14909  EDUC 290B 002 1-4 Sterponi, L. F 12:00 PM 3:00 PM    4310 BWW
33921  EDUC 290B 003 1-4 Dumas, M. W 4:00 PM 7:00 PM    4244 BWW
290C.  Special Topics Seminars.   Course may be repeated for credit. One hour of seminar per week per unit. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Topics to vary from semester to semester and section to section.

290C.  Cognition and Development. (1-4)  Staff

15110  EDUC 290C 001 1-4 Ranney, M. Th 1:00 PM 4:00 PM    4215 BWW
15109  EDUC 290C 002 1-4 Wilkerson, M. CANC 2:00 PM 5:00 PM    4422 BWW
33419  EDUC 290C 003 1-4 Wilkerson, M. M 11:00 AM 1:00 PM    4422 BWW
292.  Research Seminar and Colloquium. (1)   Course may be repeated for credit. Two hours of lecture/discussion per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.Discussion of current education research carried on by students, faculty, and guest speakers. A written analysis of several presentations required.(F,SP)

19615  SESAME 292 001 1 Goldwasser, L. M 10:30 AM 12:00 PM    1212 BWW
& Goldwasser, L.
293A.  Data Analysis in Education Research. (4)   Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Introduces students to quantitative statistical methods for educational research. Emphasizes parameter estimation and hypothesis testing, in particular of group differences based on means, medians, proportions and correlation coefficients. Section 1 takes a conceptual and heuristic approach and includes a module on distribution free statistics. Section 2 takes an algebraic approach and includes a module on multiple regression. High school algebra is strongly recommended for section 2. (F,SP) Staff

29024  EDUC 293A 001 4 Draney, K. TuTh 10:00 AM 12:00 PM    1102 BWW
293L.  Educational Data Analysis Laboratory. (1)   Two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Must be taken concurrently with 293A. Exercises and computer programs are presented and discussed.Staff

29007  EDUC 293L 001 1 Draney, K. W 4:00 PM 6:00 PM    1214 BWW
29008  EDUC 293L 002 1 Draney, K. W 2:00 PM 4:00 PM    1102 BWW
29009  EDUC 293L 003 1 Draney, K. Th 12:00 PM 2:00 PM    1207 BWW
295.  Science and Mathematics Education - Research. (1-12) Course may be repeated for credit. Zero hour of independent study per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Independent research activities under supervision of a faculty member.(F, SP).
17609  SESAME 295 001 1-12 Schoenfeld, A. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
17610  SESAME 295 002 1-12 DiSessa, A. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
17611  SESAME 295 003 1-12 Linn, M. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
17612  SESAME 295 004 1-12 Agogino, A. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
17613  SESAME 295 005 1-12 Stacy, A. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
17617  SESAME 295 009 1-12 Ranney, M. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
298A.  Group Study for Graduate Students--POME. (1-5)   Course may be repeated for credit. One to five hours of lecture/seminar per week. One hour of lecture per week per unit. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Research on special problems and topics not covered by regular courses or seminars. Topics will vary in different semesters.Staff

31496  EDUC 298A 001 1-5 Wilson, M. F 2:00 PM 4:00 PM    1204 BWW
298B.  Group Study for Graduate Students--LLSC. (1-3)   One hour of lecture/seminar per week per unit. Section 1 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. All other sections to be graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Formerly Education in Language and Literacy 298. Research on special problems and topics not covered by courses or seminars. (F,SP) Staff

15111  EDUC 298B 001 1-3 Dumas, M. CANC 4:00 PM 7:00 PM    4244 BWW
15113  EDUC 298B 003 1-3 Gutierrez, K. M 10:00 AM 12:00 PM    4500 BWW
15114  EDUC 298B 004 1-3 Baquedano-Lopez, P. W 2:00 PM 5:00 PM    1207 BWW
298C.  Group Studies, Seminars, or Group Research--DCEMST. (1-4)   One to four hours of lecture/seminar per week. Formerly Education in Mathematics, Science, and Technology 298. Advanced group study in education. Topics vary from semester to semester. May consist of organized lectures or seminar discussions, related chiefly to the research area in which the group is working. (F,SP) Staff

33515  EDUC 298C 001 1-4 Crovetti, A. Tu 9:00 AM 10:00 AM    4401 BWW
299.  Special Study and Research. (1-12)   Course may be repeated for credit. Individual conference and independent study. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Special study or research under direction of a faculty member. One unit of credit for every four hours of conference and independent research time per week.Staff

13602  EDUC 299 001 1-12 Crovetti, A. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13603  EDUC 299 002 1-12 Rabe-Hesketh, S. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13604  EDUC 299 003 1-12 Baquedano-Lopez, P. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13605  EDUC 299 004 1-12 Murphy-Graham, E. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13606  EDUC 299 005 1-12 Pearson, P. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
33638  EDUC 299 006 1-12 Yang, C. TBA 12:00 AM 12:00 AM    TBA BWW
13579  EDUC 299 007 1-12 DiSessa, A. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13580  EDUC 299 008 1-12 Abrahamson, D. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13581  EDUC 299 009 1-12 Van Rheenen, D. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13582  EDUC 299 010 1-12 Leonardo, Z. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13583  EDUC 299 011 1-12 Freedman, S. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13584  EDUC 299 012 1-12 Fuller, B. W 3:30 PM 5:30 PM    4401 BWW
13585  EDUC 299 013 1-12 Sterponi, L. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13586  EDUC 299 014 1-12 Gifford, B. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13607  EDUC 299 015 1-12 Dumas, M. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13587  EDUC 299 016 1-12 Mintrop, H. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
33569  EDUC 299 017 1-12 Ojeda-Beck, A. TBA 12:00 AM 12:00 AM    TBA BWW
13589  EDUC 299 018 1-12 Carter, P. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13590  EDUC 299 019 1-12 Gutierrez, K. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13591  EDUC 299 020 1-12 Hull, G. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13609  EDUC 299 021 1-12 Simmons, C. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13592  EDUC 299 022 1-12 Garcia-Bedolla, L. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13593  EDUC 299 023 1-12 Kramsch, C. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13610  EDUC 299 024 1-12 Bristol, T. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13611  EDUC 299 025 1-12 Britton, T. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13594  EDUC 299 026 1-12 Linn, M. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13596  EDUC 299 027 1-12 Little, J. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13597  EDUC 299 028 1-12 Mahiri, J. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13598  EDUC 299 029 1-12 Philip, T. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13612  EDUC 299 030 1-12 Cheung, R. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13613  EDUC 299 031 1-12 Perry, K. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13599  EDUC 299 032 1-12 Ranney, M. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13600  EDUC 299 033 1-12 Metz, K. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13601  EDUC 299 034 1-12 Schoenfeld, A. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13562  EDUC 299 035 1-12 Shaiken, H. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13563  EDUC 299 036 1-12 Nucci, L. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13564  EDUC 299 037 1-12 Salasin, E. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
33639  EDUC 299 038 1-12 Payson-Hays, S. TBA 12:00 AM 12:00 AM    TBA BWW
13565  EDUC 299 039 1-12 Stern, D. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13566  EDUC 299 040 1-12 Turiel, E. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13595  EDUC 299 041 1-12 Pardos, Z. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13567  EDUC 299 042 1-12 Wilkerson, M. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13568  EDUC 299 043 1-12 Wilson, M. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13569  EDUC 299 045 1-12 Yabrove, G. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13570  EDUC 299 046 1-12 Sengupta-Irving, T. TBA 12:00 AM 12:00 AM    TBA BWW
13571  EDUC 299 047 1-12 Saxe, G. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13572  EDUC 299 049 1-12 Cunningham, A. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13574  EDUC 299 051 1-12 Holloway, S. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13575  EDUC 299 052 1-12 Perlstein, D. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13576  EDUC 299 053 1-12 Worrell, F. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13577  EDUC 299 054 1-12 Scott, J. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
13578  EDUC 299 055 1-12 Trujillo, T. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
299.  Science and Mathematics Education - Individual Reading and Study. (1-5)  Course may be repeated for credit. Zero hour of independent study per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Individual reading and study under the supervision of a faculty member. (F, SP).

17602  SESAME 299 002 1-5 Clancy, M. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
17603  SESAME 299 003 1-5 Abrahamson, D. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
17604  SESAME 299 004 1-5 DiSessa, A. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
17606  SESAME 299 006 1-5 Agogino, A. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
17607  SESAME 299 007 1-5 Ranney, M. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
17600  SESAME 299 010 1-5 Stacy, A. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
375.  Art of Teaching. (1-6)   Course may be repeated for credit. One half-hour lecture, one 3/4-hour discussion and one hour field work per unit per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Consultation and analysis for teaching assistants.Hull

33795  EDUC 375 001 1-6 Hull, G. Tu 4:00 PM 7:00 PM    1211 BWW
& Van Rheenen, D.
390A.  Supervised Teaching for Secondary English. (7;8)   Prerequisites: Admission to a teaching credential program. Twenty-four to twenty-eight hours of supervised teaching in public school classrooms and one hour of lecture per week. Sequence begins with the fall semester.Staff

29028  EDUC 390A 001 7 Bloodgood, A. CANC 2:00 PM 3:30 PM    1212 BWW
29041  EDUC 390A 101 Bloodgood, A. CANC 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
390C.  Supervised Teaching Seminar. (1-8)   Course may be repeated for credit. One to three hours of lecture and two to twenty hours of fieldwork per week. Prerequisites: Admission to a teaching credential program. Formerly Educational Psychology 390. Fieldwork for teaching credential. Supervised teaching may begin with the opening of the public schools in the fall and extend through the spring semester.Wetzel de Cediel, Patel

29031  EDUC 390C 001 1-8 Patel, S. Th 2:00 PM 3:30 PM    1216 BWW
& Wetzel de Cediel, N.
29036  EDUC 390C 101 Patel, S. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
& Wetzel de Cediel, N.
33739  EDUC 390C 002 1-8 Disston, J. Th 2:00 PM 3:30 PM    1215 BWW
33740  EDUC 390C 201 1-8 Disston, J. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
390D.  Supervised Teaching in Mathematics and Science for Secondary Schools. (2-6)   Course may be repeated for credit. Two hours of lecture and two to ten hours of fieldwork per week. Prerequisites: Admission to credential program. Formerly Education in Mathematics, Science, and Technology 390. Fieldwork for teaching credential. Supervised teaching may begin with the opening of the public schools in the fall and extend through the spring semester.Zimmerlin

29030  EDUC 390D 001 2-6 Disston, J. CANC 2:00 PM 3:30 PM    1207 BWW
29037  EDUC 390D 101 Disston, J. CANC 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     Field Work
413C.  School-Based Internship in School Psychology. (2-8)   Course may be repeated for credit. Two to eight hours of lecture/discussion and at least two and one half days of fieldwork per week. Supervised assignment to a school district in capacity of school psychologist.(F)Yabrove

29015  EDUC 413C 001 2-8 Payson-Hays, S. Tu 9:00 AM 12:00 PM    4422 BWW
413L.  Consultation for School Psychology Students. (1)   Course may be repeated for credit. One hour consultation on campus and six hours of field work per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Must be taken concurrently with 213C-213D and 413C-413D.

29010  EDUC 413L 001 1 Crovetti, A. Tu 8:00 AM 9:00 AM    4401 BWW
29045  EDUC 413L 101 Crovetti, A. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
29011  EDUC 413L 002 1 Crovetti, A. Tu 1:00 PM 2:00 PM    4215 BWW
29087  EDUC 413L 201 1 Crovetti, A. 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
33524  EDUC 413L 003 1 Perry, K. Tu 1:00 PM 2:00 PM    1212 BWW
33526  EDUC 413L 301 1 Perry, K. TBA 12:00 AM 12:00 AM    TBA BWW
460A.  Practicum in School Site Management I. (3)   Three hours of lecture and field work per week. Prerequisites: Admission to Administrative Services Credential program.Supervised field experience, conferences, and colloquium.Staff

29120  EDUC 460A 001 3 Green, T. S 1:30 PM 4:30 PM    1102 BWW
602.  Science and Mathematics Education - Individual Study for Qualifying Examination (1-8) Zero hour of independent study per week. Individual study, under the supervision of a faculty member, designed to prepare the student for Ph.D qualifying.(F, SP).
18017  SESAME 602 001 1-8 Schoenfeld, A. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
18019  SESAME 602 004 1-8 Ranney, M. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
18020  SESAME 602 006 1-8 DiSessa, A. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
18021  SESAME 602 007 1-8 Stacy, A. INDIV 12:00 AM 12:00 AM     BWW
8/28/19