Berkeley Educators for Equity and Excellence (BE3)

Sarah W. Freedman

Sarah Warshauer Freedman studies the teaching and learning of written language, as well as ways English is taught in schools. Her research focuses on US schools but also includes cross-national comparisons. Besides studying written language, she is interested in societal divisions that lead to conflict and inequality. She has conducted research on teaching and learning about civics and has studied how adolescents on varied sides of societal divides develop as citizens and civic actors. Her work on societal divides has included research on the role of education in reconstructing societies...

Michelle Hoda Wilkerson

I am a learning scientist whose work explores computational literacy, with special focus on how young people learn about scientific computing tools such as computer simulation, data visualization, or statistical analysis packages. Tools like these have transformed how science and mathematics are done, and there are growing calls to incorporate them into K-12 education. However, while there is growing commitment among educators to teach science and mathematics “as practice,” scientific computing is still often presented simplistically in curriculum as a conceptual aid or accurate...

Tesha Sengupta-Irving (She/Hers)

Associate Professor, Learning Sciences & STEM Education Affiliate Associate Professor, UCB Center for Race & Gender

Research

Dr. Sengupta-Irving’s research explores the sociocultural, disciplinary, and political dimensions of children’s mathematics learning. Broadly, her work asks a deceptively simple question: What, in addition to mathematics, do children learn when they learn mathematics? Dr. Sengupta-Irving works closely with teachers to understand and design pedagogical approaches that promote...

Wai Ho

Wai’s work as a teacher is rooted in her belief in the ingenuity of youth, and the rich linguistic and cultural assets they have to offer to their schools and communities. She views her role in the classroom as a facilitator and seeks to cultivate reciprocal teaching and learning partnerships with her students. She began her work in higher education with students learning English as an additional language and was drawn into K-12 public education by the exciting and critical conversations she had with youth around English language learning; how literacy practices are constructed; and how...

Travis J. Bristol (he/him/his)

Travis J. Bristol is an assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley’s Graduate School of Education. Before joining Berkeley's faculty, he was a Peter Paul Assistant Professor at Boston University. Dr. Bristol's research is situated at the intersection of educational policy and teacher education. Using qualitative methods, he explores three related research strands: (1) the role of educational policies in shaping teacher workplace experiences and retention; (2) district and school-based professional learning communities...

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BE3 Co-Director (ELA/History)

Originally from Evanston, Illinois, Sarah Altschul graduated from the GSE's MUSE program in 2003 and taught high school English, ELD and Journalism for over a decade in Hayward and San Lorenzo Unified School Districts.

From 2010-2015 Sarah was a Literacy and Instructional Coach for Oakland Unified, operating out of Elmhurst Community Prep in East Oakland where she designed and taught a school-wide reading intervention program for 6th-8th grade middle school students. As a member of the Instructional Leadership Team Sarah helped to de-track cohorts, implement a new CCSS curriculum...

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