News

May 9, 2020

The sudden need for distance learning imposed upon schools worldwide by the COVID-19 pandemic has created a huge market for online learning applications. Some have been around for decades while others seemed to have popped up overnight.

May 8, 2020

For the first time in its 38-year history, the GSE’s Academic Talent Development Program (ATDP) will be exclusively online this summer, offering nearly all of its rigorous academic in-person courses as it has in previous years.

May 7, 2020

Have you noticed conflict around - and perhaps within - you these recent months? Maybe of the familiar global and national varieties, nightmarishly intensified? Or maybe you’ve been playing referee among a houseful of stir crazy youth, worrying and wondering about what kind of world they’ll inherit. Maybe, like me, you’ve found yourself navigating online social- and professional circles in which there’s a disorienting blend of shell shock, anxiety, disagreement, sorrow...gratitude, concern, love, hopefulness.

April 17, 2020

UC Berkeley hosted three leading Berkeley psychologists who discussed effective approaches and strategies for dealing with the anxiety, stress and uncertainty that are inherent parts of the COVID-19 crisis, for children and adults alike.

The original broadcast was live on Friday, April 17, Noon-12:30p Pacific

April 14, 2020

K-12 science teachers worldwide who find themselves suddenly giving lessons online are turning to the Web-Based Inquiry Science Environment (WISE), a free, open-source, standards-based inquiry science curricula that also provides peer-to-peer support and professional development.

April 12, 2020

The rush to push in-class learning into an online experience may be leaving out one crucial piece to helping students succeed – incentivising participation.

Many colleges and universities are facing the policy question of whether to make attendance of synchronous online sessions optional.

March 18, 2020

The university has announced steps designed to help limit coronavirus (COVID-19) risk on campus. The changes will remain in place through the end of the semester.

Updates from campus leaders offer details, which include temporarily suspending in-person instruction; and a cancellation of all on-campus events.

The campus has also set up an informational website.

February 6, 2020

Stay connected to what GSE faculty and students are saying and writing about in the news.*

November 24, 2019

With growing research showing that performance on the SAT and ACT are impacted by ethnicity and socio-economics, Chancellor Carol T. Christ and other UC leaders say they are ready to end the use of such standardized tests in the college admissions process.

November 11, 2019

Imagine a school with a speedy elevator, another with a smooth-riding escalator, and another with broken stairwell.  At each school, students are all tasked with reaching the top floor.

November 4, 2019

The Graduate School of Education (GSE) is partnering with the Kapor Center and the Oakland Unified School District (OUSD) to establish the California Computer Science Project (CCSP), aimed at increasing the number of girls, low-income students and students of color in Computer Science courses including AP Computer Science in public schools.

October 24, 2019

A three-year effort led by the GSE’s College and Career Academy Support Network (CCASN) has resulted in a series of reports designed to offer guidance to, and encourage greater collaboration among educators, policy makers, and researchers by defining research priorities around the key issues impacting equity in student outcomes from college and career pathways.

October 8, 2019

By Ellen Lee
Contributing Writer

A classically trained violinist, Rachel Chen has performed in quartets, on stage with orchestras, and even in spontaneous jam sessions with street musicians.

Now Chen’s musical background comes in handy as she studies the behavior and interactions of autistic individuals, in particular, stimming, or self-stimulating; and repetitive actions such as the flapping of hands, the continuous tapping of various objects, or the back-and-forth rocking of the body.

September 30, 2019

By Wylie Wong
Contributing Writer

Teacher Colleen Sutherland and her students stood several hundred steps away from the Campanile, but they were not there to admire the famous Berkeley landmark.

September 25, 2019

Fewer missed opportunities. Better prepared transfer students. Very possibly an increase in college completion rates. That is the potential impact of Professor Zachary Pardos’s latest research on how using big data techniques to analyze college courses can improve a transfer student’s class selection.

September 18, 2019

By Ilene Lelchuk
Contributing Writer

Chunyan Yang is so passional about the power of public education and the importance of school psychology that sometimes she tears up when discussing her career path. “Public education can bring unimaginable growth and opportunity. I couldn’t imagine that without public education, I would have gotten to this point,” Yang, who grew up in rural China, said as the words caught in her throat. “Schooling is a public good, a core value.”

By Dara A. Tom

IN THE EARLY GRADE SCHOOL YEARS, MATH IS DESIGNED to be taught with colorful manipulatives (wooden blocks, magnets, etc.), puzzles, and games. Around 3rd grade, for too many students, it becomes drudgery, and labels such as being “good” or “bad” take hold. The rest is history.

Plants eat dirt. Heat causes climate change.

While these statements might not be entirely scientifically accurate, they can serve as the beginning of deeper discussions and explorations rather than shutting down a student’s thinking about scientific processes.

By the Writing Data Stories Research Group

WRITING DATA STORIES is a new project that seeks to reorganize how young people, especially linguistically and ethnoracially minoritized students, learn about and interact with data. The project will engage middle school students in exploring scientific datasets about earth and the environment using flexible online data visualization and analysis tools.

Professor Geoffrey Saxe, who studies cognitive development with a focus on mathematical cognition, has retired after 21 years at the Graduate School of Education.