News

November 4, 2019

The Graduate School of Education (GSE) is partnering with the Kapor Center and the Oakland Unified School District (OUSD) to establish the California Computer Science Project (CCSP), aimed at increasing the number of girls, low-income students and students of color in Computer Science courses including AP Computer Science in public schools.

October 24, 2019

A three-year effort led by the GSE’s College and Career Academy Support Network (CCASN) has resulted in a series of reports designed to offer guidance to, and encourage greater collaboration among educators, policy makers, and researchers by defining research priorities around the key issues impacting equity in student outcomes from college and career pathways.

October 8, 2019

By Ellen Lee
Contributing Writer

A classically trained violinist, Rachel Chen has performed in quartets, on stage with orchestras, and even in spontaneous jam sessions with street musicians.

Now Chen’s musical background comes in handy as she studies the behavior and interactions of autistic individuals, in particular, stimming, or self-stimulating; and repetitive actions such as the flapping of hands, the continuous tapping of various objects, or the back-and-forth rocking of the body.

September 30, 2019

By Wylie Wong
Contributing Writer

Teacher Colleen Sutherland and her students stood several hundred steps away from the Campanile, but they were not there to admire the famous Berkeley landmark.

September 25, 2019

Fewer missed opportunities. Better prepared transfer students. Very possibly an increase in college completion rates. That is the potential impact of Professor Zachary Pardos’s latest research on how using big data techniques to analyze college courses can improve a transfer student’s class selection.

September 18, 2019

Professor Susan Holloway, whose interdisciplinary approach to research explores the conditions that support parents’ childrearing goals and practices, emotional wellbeing, and parenting self-efficacy, has retired after 22 years at the Graduate School of Education.

Plants eat dirt. Heat causes climate change.

While these statements might not be entirely scientifically accurate, they can serve as the beginning of deeper discussions and explorations rather than shutting down a student’s thinking about scientific processes.

By Erin Chan Ding
Contributing Writer

As a restorative justice program coordinator at her alma mater Berkeley High School, Mahasan Offutt-Chaney started wondering about how her everyday work intersected with educational policy.

She began asking, “How are some students in particular, like black students, over-policed and penalized and suspended in school? How are schools practicing punitive practices?”